Posted by Kevin Vaughan on Tue, Dec 06, 2011 @ 06:18 AM

On the surface, the HP T2300 eMFP seems like a slam dunk when considering a new printer, plotter, and scanner. But, wait! Look past the initial impression and you’ll discover that the T2300 has some significant flaws—ones that could be detrimental to the operation of your business.

Here is a list of the top 15 things that are wrong with the T2300 eMFP.

  1. Printing postscript files natively is only possible when the Postscript HP T2300 eMFPoption is purchased. This is an added expense.
  2. On the HP T2300, it is not possible to scan to a PDF file format without the Postscript option installed.
  3. The HP T2300 printer plotter cannot print DWF from the USB port or from the HP Web Access Software. If you try to print a DWF from one of these sources, the printer will freeze and you must restart it. Sometimes it takes two reboots to fully come back online.
  4. The T2300 printer plotter requires you to load paper from the back of the printer. This will cost you more floor space and loading time.
  5. The HP completely stops when you need to change an ink cartridge. This is disruptive to your workflow. On the contrary, other printer plotter manufacturers are employing a sub-ink system so that ink can be changed “on the fly”, while the printer is still in motion.
  6. The HP T2300 eMFP has no job management function. The HP plotter only has file management capabilities which make the system difficult to manage with multiple users and multi-page sets.
  7. The HP doesn’t do a good job with auto rotation. Unless you remember to manually rotate a drawing, you will lose some information on the print. This will cause you to have to reprint the job.
  8. On the HP scanner, the original sheet ejects from the front. So every original physically has to pass through the scanner two times. Besides taking more time, this adds additional wear and tear which could mean damage to your fragile documents.
  9. The scanner on the HP T2300 doesn’t have any type of digital compression. This means that the file size of a scanned image can be quite large. This can be very taxing on both your system and network resources.
  10. The HP T2300 eMFP only allows you to scan to one network destination. This could be problematic in shared or enterprise environment.
  11. The HP has no “set copy” functionality. In other words, you will not be able to digitally organize the original set to produce collated copies. The HP requires you to copy each sheet independently.
  12. The T2300 printer plotter’s touchscreen is very sensitive. Many users have complained about accidentally selecting the wrong options because of the hyper-sensitive interface.
  13. The HP touchscreen response is slow.
  14. When submitting a job, the T2300 requires users manually adjust each setting for each different type of job. On the other hand, some competing wide-format plotters allow you to make global adjustments and save them as templates that can be recalled at another time.
  15. The HP T2300 uses a traditional gravity fed basket to receive documents. This type of retrieval system is prone to excessive jamming issues. In a shared workspace, a motorized stacker option performs much better.

So, while the HP T2300 eMFP seems like a solid option at first, there are some operational weaknesses that you need to assess before making a decision to purchase one. Chances are if you are in the market for a wide-format printer plotter, then it is an integral part of your business. Be sure you get the right equipment for the job.

Do you agree with these statements? Explain.

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Kevin Vaughan

Written by Kevin Vaughan

Kevin Vaughan is the Vice President of TAVCO and heads up Sales, Digital Marketing, and E-Commerce channels. With two decades of experience, he has received various awards from Canon, Océ, and Bluebeam for sales performance and channel growth. When he is not geeking out on new wide-format technologies, or Bluebeam Revu software, you can find him hanging with his wife and kids, playing guitar, or sneaking in a workout.